Darling Buds

PUBLISHED: 13:07 16 March 2011 | UPDATED: 19:00 20 February 2013

Darling Buds

Darling Buds

Although spring has now officially sprung, it can still be a bit chilly to do any serious gardening. However as days lengthen the plants can wait no longer, breaking leaf bud and coming into flower with increasing enthusiasm

And if gardening proper does not appeal, then it is a great time of year to bring the garden indoors. The daffodils will be blooming their socks off, but there are many other less obvious plants that will look great arranged in a vase.
I visited Newbury based florist Lucy Lawrence for some seasonal advice.
At this time of year I start off with foliage; she tells me Evergreens like hebe and Choisia are really good for texture and I use loads of twigs. Then choose a few blooms, daffodils are fine, but you can use whatever is to hand or you can always top up with a few shop-bought flowers! she smiles.
When dealing with the ubiquitous daffodil, Lucy suggests hand-tied posies, gathered tightly at the neck, perhaps with contrasting sprigs of foliage like rosemary. These can then go straight into a vase or be edged with big ivy leaves for a more fulsome effect.
Back home, I have been cutting great armfuls of forsythia for simple, high-impact displays. From hot-pink flowering current to big, blowsy camellias, there are lots of options with attitude but while these bold displays can be stylish, they are not for everyone.
I like the minimalist look; says Lucy, indicating an elegantly spare arrangement in a slender glass vase,
I think these pussy willows are lovely by themselves.
Of course, it is not all about tall twigs and screamingly bright flowers. China teacups of primroses or Chionodoxa can be very dainty, as can small flowers arranged with a few twigs in jug. The container can be as important an element as the plant material, and Lucy sees no need to be restrictive.
I like jugs and vintage vases but really you can use whatever is at hand. She says, deftly snipping tete-a-tete daffodils and pussy willow into a tiny posy that she bulks up with a few sprigs of Gaultheria foliage.
Whether you ever intended to plant a cutting garden or are just pruning the Cornus and other shrubs, early spring presents the ideal opportunity to get a little bit extra from your planting. So grab the secateurs and get snipping. Bring the prunings and foliage inside, get creative and enjoy your own distinctive take on home-grown floristry.


Get in contact
LuLu Flowers, 2 Pound St, Newbury, Berkshire, RG14 6AA
Tel: 01635 522888


Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Berkshire Life