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Reading firm Clifton Ingram in top 3 nationally for donating to Will Aid’s 25th anniversary campaign

PUBLISHED: 16:26 14 February 2014 | UPDATED: 16:26 14 February 2014

Peter McGeown from Clifton Ingram Solicitors being presented a ‘Good Solicitor’ Award at the firm’s Reading office  by Peter O'Loughlin, Legacy Relationship Manager at Age UK.

Peter McGeown from Clifton Ingram Solicitors being presented a ‘Good Solicitor’ Award at the firm’s Reading office by Peter O'Loughlin, Legacy Relationship Manager at Age UK.

Archant

Reading and Wokingham solicitors, Clifton Ingram LLP, is one of the top three donating firms nationally for Will Aid’s 25th anniversary campaign, thanks to the generosity of their clients.

Will Aid is an annual charity fundraising initiative, held each November, during which Clifton Ingram’s Wills Department draw up basic Wills for new clients participating in the scheme at no charge, asking in return that the Will-maker made a donation to the Will Aid charities.

Clifton Ingram has participated in six Will Aid campaigns and has written approximately 1,000 Wills for people locally at no charge - in total, the firm has raised over £42,000 for the Will Aid charities.

Peter McGeown, Partner and Head of the Tax Planning, Wills & Probate department at Clifton Ingram Solicitors said, “Will Aid offers us an excellent opportunity to use our professional skills to generate significant charitable donations and at the same time encourage people to get their legal affairs in order.”

Will Aid is a campaign run by nine of the UK’s best known charities: ActionAid, AGE UK, British Red Cross, Christian Aid, NSPCC, Save the Children UK, Sight Savers International, SCIAF (Scotland) and Trocaire (N. Ireland) and has helped raise £15 million for them.

Making a Will is an important way of protecting family and loved ones in the future yet it is surprising how few people have made one. If someone dies without a Will, then their assets are distributed according to the laws of intestacy – a detailed impersonal set of rules that dictate where the money goes.

The rules of intestacy often produce surprising and in many cases an unfair outcome with regard to the distribution of an estate. There is no guarantee that the surviving spouse would be able to keep the family home – it may have to be sold to pay other relatives.

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